Health / Health Care

A Crash Course on the Taiwanese Health Care System

A Crash Course on the Taiwanese Health Care System

Jason Tan de Bibiana

Abstract:

The Taiwanese health care system has famously been described as a car manufactured domestically from parts imported from abroad [3]. For many years, Taiwan studied the health care systems of other countries and consulted with health policy experts from around the world, before orchestrating a dramatic transformation of its own health care system. In 1995, Taiwan introduced its National Health Insurance program (known as the NHI), which extended health insurance coverage to all Taiwanese citizens and legal residents. Taiwan designed and implemented a government-run, single-payer system with universal insurance coverage much like what we have here in Canada. However, the Taiwanese system also boasts comprehensive coverage for prescription drugs, dental care, and traditional Chinese medicine, a cohesive electronic health-records system, and relatively short waiting times for health care.

Link to full article: A Crash Course on the Taiwanese Health Care System

Jason Tan de Bibiana is interested in public health research and practice that addresses the social determinants of health, improves health care systems, and reduces inequity. He thinks that there is a lot of work to be done locally and globally. Jason graduated from McGill University with a Bachelor of Science in physiology, geography, and social studies of medicine and is currently based in Vancouver at the University of British Columbia‘s School of Population and Public Health, where he is pursuing a Master of Science in epidemiology, public health, and health services research.

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